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Returning surveyor says he'll keep changes made by Mayhew
PULASKI COUNTY, Mo. (Nov. 8, 2008) — John Mackey, D-Waynesville, will be back in his former office as Pulaski County Surveyor now that he’s defeated the incumbent, Republican Don Mayhew of Crocker.

Mackey stayed at the courthouse Tuesday night until the last absentee ballots were counted, which placed him ahead by a margin of 6,376 votes to 6,162. Mayhew had been leading until the absentee votes were counted.

Mackey, who served for decades as the county surveyor before he was defeated four years ago by Mayhew in a 2004 Republican landslide that swept most local Democrats out of office, said he didn’t plan any major changes. He said he also anticipates keeping two changes made by Mayhew — moving the county survey records into the courthouse and continuing as the county’s flood plain administrator.

During Mackey’s previous terms in office, he’d kept the survey records in his own office about a block away from the courthouse; moving the records to the courthouse was one of Mayhew’s campaign pledges four years ago. More recently, Mayhew worked out an agreement with the county commissioners and with County Clerk Diana Linnenbringer, whose office had been handling flood plain administrator duties, to take over the flood plain paperwork.

“I’ve taken courses in flood plain administration and management,” Mackey said. I’m very comfortable doing flood plains. It’s up to the county commission who they want to handle that role, and if they want me to do that, I will look into it.”

Preparing flood plain maps can be critical because owners of houses or businesses in a flood plain often have to purchase special insurance and designation of flood plains can be crucial to property values. When a major flood hits areas that don’t usually flood, as happened this year with floods in downtown Waynesville, getting accurate flood plain maps can be crucial for disaster assistance and future help to property owners.

The surveyor’s job is unpaid except when he’s assigned to a specific task by the county and isn’t going to be a major part of Mackey’s duties; he runs a surveying and engineering firm in Waynesville and will continue that work.

“I just want to say thank you to those who voted for me, and I look forward to serving the county for another four years,” Mackey said. “I’ll work with the people of the county and the county commission to do whatever they plan to work on with me.”

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