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Paramedic’s Corner: Explaining what emergency medical service workers do
Paramedic’s Corner: Explaining what emergency medical service workers do

Ambulance Director Gary Carmack
The week of May 16 to 22 is Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Week with the following theme: “EMS: Anytime, Anywhere, We’ll Be There.”

This was designated by many organizations such as the American College of Emergency Physicians because EMS is a vital public service. The members of EMS teams are ready to provide lifesaving care to those in need 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Access to quality emergency care dramatically improves the survival and recovery rate of those who experience sudden illness or injury.

The EMS system consists of emergency physicians, emergency nurses, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), paramedics, firefighters, educators, administrators-chiefs and others. These members of EMS teams work hard and engage in thousands of hours of specialized training and continuing education to enhance their lifesaving skills.

Therefore, it is appropriate to recognize the value and accomplishments of emergency medical services providers by designating emergency medical services week. If the readers happen to come into contact with any EMS System team member this week, please say hello and visit with them a few seconds. Of course we hope seeing them is not because of an injury or illness.

Some things the EMS teams would like to tell the readers:

Motor Vehicle Crash (MVC): it is trauma season (though trauma season never seems to end for us), but please drive carefully, slow down and wear appropriate safety restraints. It is not uncommon to see people passing on blind curves and hills on highways. I see this on Highway T, Highway 7, and others all the time. They fly, and it is scary! Do not drive impaired or ride with anyone impaired. Remember, texting while driving is extremely dangerous.

Falls: try to help any elderly citizens do a safety check for their home. If you need help, contact the ambulance base and we will help.

Chest pain: enter the EMS System immediately. Call 911 and get EMS coming. To delay can be deadly!

Stroke symptoms: call 911 immediately as so much can be done these days so the person can continue a good quality of life, if the person gets to an appropriate facility in enough time.

Heroin: Heroin overdoses and deaths are raging in our county. Please teach anyone you know how dangerous this drug is. Report any activity to the appropriate police agency.

April was busy at the Pulaski County Ambulance District. PCAD responded 417 times to calls, bringing the yearly total of responses to date at 1,803 patients. The highest call area in June remains Waynesville with 132 calls and St. Robert with 124, followed by Richland at 80 and Crocker 36. PCAD responded to Fort Leonard Wood nine times, Rolla nine, and Laquey 10. Most of the Rolla and Fort Wood responses were for transfers.

The hospitals most requested and transported to were Phelps County Regional Medical Center in Rolla with 81 transports, St. John’s Hospital in Lebanon with 70, General Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital with 61, and Lake Regional Medical Center at Osage Beach with 19. The highest number of long-distance transports was St. John’s Hospital in Springfield with 10.

PCAD is doing a lot of HeartSaver CPR programs. WE recently did a group of 20 Boy Scouts in Crocker. Any group wanting CPR or First aid classes may contact us at (573)774-5413 or e-mail me at gcarmack@embarqmail.com.

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